There is few ways to measure your wrist size precisily. We made quick presentation video how you can measure wrist size correctly. You just need piece of rope, pen and measuring tape. Watch the video below!

Average men´s and women´s wrist sizes

Investigating different sources we could estimate that average men´s wrist size is approximately 18,5cm and women´s wrist size 17,8cm. These sizes are estimated using few different sources. Im not sure is this kind of average size so important information. More likely we should say that most of the men´s size various from 17-21cm. Some of people have thinner or thicker wrist. Same way in most cases, women´s wrist size various from 15-19cm.


This time Timemachine.fi introduces one of the most famous watch brands in the world. If you are real watch hobbyist or collector, you have often heard the name of Omega. Omega is one of the watch brand icons and definately one of the most desirable watches among watch collectors. Omega is the last letter of Greek alphabets and is the symbol in the all Omega watch dials.

THE HISTORY OF OMEGA

Omega watchbrand is established in the 14th of July 1848 by Louis Brandt, who was only 23-years old. Louis Brandt founded La Generale Watch Co, his sales office and factory at La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland. There he started to make key-wounded pocket watches of parts he acquired from local watchmakers. He sold his watches throughout Europe, mainly to Britain which was his main market.

On the July 1877 he and his son Louis-Paul established Louis Brandt & Fils. Two years later, Louis Brandt died in La Chaux-de-Fonds on the 5th of July 1879. In 1880 brothers Louis-Paul and Cesar Brandt moved into a small factory in the city of Biel, Switzerland, which was former textile industry city. In Biel brothers launched their first watch brands. These brands were Louis Brandt and Gurzelen in 1882, Décimal in 1884 and Labrador in 1885. Each brand was based in similar movements, but they had their own characteristic. 1889 company was the largest watch manufacturer and they employed 600 workers and produced 100000 units of watches annually. Watches achieved a precision of within 30 seconds a day in 1895.

The success led to the firm becoming a centre of research and development and around in 1900 production increased to units of 240000 watches produced annually and employing 800 people. The Brandt brothers, Louis-Paul and Cesar Brandt, both died in 1903 and same year the company officially changed its name to OMEGA Watch Co. The control of the company took over the four persons and the oldest, who was Paul-Emile Brandt was only 23-years old.

The company name Omega was officially changed in 1903, but the first watch to appear under this name was released in 1909 at the Gordon Bennett Cup, an international ballooning contest. Omega started to get popularity in sports events and The British Royal Flying Corps decided to choose Omega watches in 1917 as their official timekeepers for its combat units, as did the American army in 1918. It was the reputation for accuracy that led to the decision made by the International Olympic Committee to appoint Omega as the official timekeeper of the 1932 Los Angeles Games. It was the first time in Olympic history that one brand had been given the responsibility to time all events. Since 1932, Omega has been the official timekeeper at 26 Olympic Games.

Omega Speedmaster was created in 1957. NASA decided to use Omega Speedmaster Professional Chronograph wristwatch in 1965 as its official timekeeper. On 21st July 1969 astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first man on the moon and he said famous slogan “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”, he was wearing his Omega Speedmaster Professional chronograph. This watch received a unique nickname: the Moon watch. 

1991 Omega introduced exceptional co-axial escapement which has extended service life of 10 years.

OMEGA GENEVE CAL. 552

Omega Geneve model was created in 1953 and production was stopped in 1979. Obviously the model name of Geneve is based to the city in Switzerland. Geneve models were available in different movement and case variations. There were at least handwinding movements as 601, 611 and 613 with/without date function. Automatic watch models had for example 552, 563 ja 565 with/without date function depending on caliber. Case materials where stainless steel, gold plated or solid gold.

Omega caliber 552 is automatic movement with sweep second feature. Movement has 24 jewels, amplitude 19800 A/h and power reserve 50h. Diameter of movement is approx. 28mm and height is 4,5mm. 

The following photos of the Omega Geneve is from private collection. Overall watch condition is decent if considering the age of the watch. It has slight patina in dial and frame, but it is pretty normal to vintage watch which has been used in daily life. 

According to the serial number, this Omega Geneve is manufactured about 1968.


HISTORY OF POLJOT

Poljot is a brand of Soviet/Russian wristwatches. Poljot watches has been produced since 1964 by the First Moscow Watch Factory. Poljot is the most famous brand of the USSR watch industry. 

Founded in 1930 under orders from Joseph Stalin, the First State Watch Factory was the first large scale Soviet watch and mechanical movement manufacturer. Via its USA-based trading company Amtorg, the Soviet government bought the defunct Ansonia Clock Company of Brooklyn, New York in 1929, and the Dueber-Hampden Watch Company of Canton, Ohio. It moved twenty-eight freight cars full of machinery and parts from the USA to Moscow in order to establish the factory. Twenty-one former Dueber-Hampden watchmakers, engravers and various other technicians helped to train the Russian workers in the art of watchmaking as part of the Soviet’s first five-year plan. The movements of very-early products were still stamped “Dueber-Hampden, Canton, Ohio, USA” (examples of these watches are very collectible today). In 1935 the factory was named after the murdered Soviet official Sergei Kirov.

As the Germans closed in on Moscow in 1941, the factory was hurriedly evacuated to Zlatoust. 1943 the Germans were in retreat, and the factory moved back to Moscow, adopting the “First Moscow Watch Factory” name (Russian: Первый Московский Часовой Завод – 1МЧЗ).

In 1947 the first wrist watches under the brand name “Pobeda” and the first Marine Chronometers and Deck watches were produced. By 1951 the production of wrist watches had increased to 1.1 million. In 1975 new machinery and equipment for manufacturing complex watches was imported from Switzerland. The first chronograph “Okean” (caliber 3133) was produced for the space station “Sojuz-23.”

In 1990 production of watches and clocks reached 5 million pieces, and in 1991 the international award “Golden Trophy for Quality” was awarded in Madrid.

Poljot has produced numerous historical watches used in many important space missions, including the world’s first space watch worn by Yuri Gagarin. Poljot literally means “Flight”. (Russian: Полёт) First Moscow Watch Factory has produced several different types of calibers such as 2409, 2415, 2609, but the most famous is reliable workhorse chronograph 3133 movement.

Poljot 3133 chronograph movement

POLJOT 3133

The Poljot 3133 is a manual winding chronograph movement produced since the 1980’s.

Introduced in the 1970’s but not generally available until 1983, Calibre 3133 includes elements of earlier Venus movements, notably the Venus 150, Venus 188, and Valjoux 7734. It is not a copy or clone of these movements, but Poljot did purchase machinery and tooling and adapt elements of these calibres into the evolving 3133 design.

The Venus company produced the cal. 188 from 1949 up until they withdrew from the marketplace in 1966. Another Swiss company, Valjoux, bought the tools and rights to produce the Venus 188 and continued to produce a slightly modified version of the chronograph, rebranded cal. 7730, through 1968. At this point, Valjoux further refined the movement as 7733, and 7734 with date function. The early production Valjoux 7734 most resembles what we know the initial production of the Poljot 3133 to be.

The Poljot 3133 is a cam controlled chronograph operating at 21,600 A/h. It has a 30 minute counter at 3:00, a small seconds dial at 9:00, and a central sweep seconds counter along with the hour and minute hands. A date window is located at 6:00. Two buttons control the chronograph functions: The 2:00 pusher for starting and stopping the chronograph, and the 4:00 pusher to reset the seconds and minute counters. Poljot 3133 is nominally a 23 jewel movement, but several jewels are used on both sides..

Some of the initial modifications made by Poljot to the 7734 included a taller main plate, third wheel plate with jewel bearing, jewelled chronograph gears, smaller and faster running balance with shock protection, and quickset date mechanism. Curiously, the initial version of the Poljot 3133 utilized the older version of the 7733/34 reset function (hammer, fly-back lever) that was produced between 1968-1971.

This is quite different from the Venus and Valjoux calibres with which it shares components and design elements. Those are slow 18,000 A/h movements with fewer 17 jewels. The Swiss movements use an entirely different assortment (balance and escapement) and has many differences in the bridges and levers. But many others are identical between the movements. The movements are not interchangeable either, since the dial feet are located differently, and the movement is 1 mm thicker. Interestingly, the date wheel on the Poljot advances clockwise like modern ETA movements, while older Venus calbres used counter-clockwise date wheels.

There are a few variants on the basic Poljot design. Calibres 31679 (with moon phase hand) and 31682 (with day/night display) include extra complications. The 17 jewel calibre 3105 lacks the chronograph functions and simply has sub seconds at 9:00 and date window at 3:00.

In 1974, a year after production began on the new cal. 7750 automatic chronograph, Valjoux discontinued production of the 7734 and sold the tools, and presumably the rights to produce the chronograph to Poljot. The ETA 7750 is still in production to this day , while the production of the MakTime 3133 ended in 2011.

Mechanically not too many modifications have been made to the Poljot 3133 over the last thirty plus years. Notable changes where an improved mainspring in 1987, an improved metal alloy balance wheel in 1992 and seemingly lower-quality levers and eccentrics from the late 1990s on.

Poljot continued to produce the 3133 chronograph up until the end of 2004, when the MakTime company purchased the Poljot 3133 machinery, relocated the equipment to their factory in south-east Moscow, and continued production starting in June 2005. After only a few short years, low-sales/profits and out-dated equipment forced an end to production in 2011. The MakTime company produced the cal. 3133 for a handful of companies including Moscow Classic, Volmax (Aviator, Sturmanskie, Buran), Juri Levenberg (Pilot, Strela), Poljot-International, PoinTec (Junkers, Zepplin), Poljot-Chonos (The President), as well as their own in house brands (MakTime, MWG).

As of July 2013, new movements continue to be available in remaining retail stocks, however, some of the more popular cal. 3133 chronographs, such as the Zeppelin models, are now nearing extinction.


Mechanical watches and clocks have amazed people for centuries and now it is possibility almost every on build one. Timemachine.fi is now introducing very intresting project for watchmakers, watch hobbyists, engineers or people who just like to have fun with 3D-printer. 

Timemachine.fi introduces this amazing 3D-printed tourbillon which is fully functional. Creator of this masterpiece is Swiss engineer Christoph Laimer. Christoph is not a watchmaker. He has studied electrical engineering and working for 18 years for example in computer science inqustry.

“The Laimer Tourbillon is an innovative design with the heart beating highly visible in the core. The key function to indicate the time is direct and straight. Balance, escape wheel, tourbillon cage, hands, and barrel are all arranged co-axial. Gears for the transmission from the barrel, and the reduction from seconds to minutes and hours are placed behind the tourbillon in order to keep the design circular.

All parts are 3d-printed except a few screws and pins. The concept also includes a 3d-printed mainspring even though it is irrational (plastic is not elastic – it slowly flows and deforms). In order to make it 3d-printable, a lot of engineering effort was invested. The complete movement was essentially re-invented. The resulting timepiece works surprisingly well – of course, with it’s runtime and accuracy, it can’t compete with a conventional watch.The entire 3d-model is published and downloadable on Thingiverse. Many thanks to Nicholas Manousos for his great article in Hodinkee explaining the importance of my project from a traditional watchmakers perspective. Seeing his 3d-printed Tourbillon 1000% in action was very motivating to finish my work.” says homepage of Christoph Laimer.

The best part of this project really is that all 3D-models are downloadable in Thingiverse so all other persons can try to print and assemble very own 3D-tourbillon: 

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1249221

Check more details from this unique project from the inventor´s homepage where is also other intresting 3D-projects: http://www.laimer.ch/  and also Hodinkee website: https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/a-major-step-forward-in-horological-additive-manufacturing-christoph-laimers-3d-printed-tourbillon

There is another amazing 3D-project finished and project is 3D-printed triple-axis tourbillon by Adam Wrigley. Triple-axis tourbillon are probably one of the complicated subassembly to manufacture in watchmaking, because it needs hundreds of hours hand- and finishing work. Only few watchmaking companies are able to manufacture one. This one is also fully working and it has designed mechanical engineer Adam Wrigley at Frog design. Man himself is a mechinal watch fanatic. The final design consists of 99 parts: 34 printed parts, eight ball bearings, three metal shafts, two barbell plates, one meter of fishing line, and 51 screws. Read more about project from http://wornandwound.com/clockwerk-3d-printed-triple-axis-tourbillon-adam-wrigley/

If you are intrested to make your own, download all 3D-files of triple-axis tourbillon from Thingiverse: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1624844

If you have 3D-printer and you are willing to print your own tourbillon, you must have patient and time to print all parts. It can take up to 2-3 hours to print one part. Timemachine.fi encourage everyone to build own tourbillon! Go for it! Have a nice 3D-printing!

Copyrights of photos belongs to their original owners.